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I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew Reviewed by Children's Books for Parents on March 4.

Solla Sollew is a tale of a young person who discovers the “troubles” of life and wishes to escape them. Through a series of adventures experienced when trying to reach the mythical city of the title (“where they never have troubles/at least very few”) the protagonist comes to realize that he must face his problems … Continue reading

Solla Sollew is a tale of a young person who discovers the “troubles” of life and wishes to escape them. Through a series of adventures experienced when trying to reach the mythical city of the title (“where they never have troubles/at least very few”) the protagonist comes to realize that he must face his problems instead of running away from them. (At the end of the book, it is revealed that the mythical city has just one problem: a creature given to slapping keys out of keyholes has taken up residence in the gate to the city, and it is considered extremely bad luck to kill this kind of creature. As a result, nobody can get into the city. In fact, the mayor moves to another city called Boola Boom-Ball, “where they never have troubles/no troubles at all.”) It features typical fantastic occurrences, as well as some mild political statements. In one instance, the protagonist is forced to pull a wagon for a bossy would-be helper. In another scene, he is drafted into the army under the command of the fearsome, but ultimately cowardly, tyrant General Genghis Khan Schmitz.

I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew

Book

I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew

By: Dr. Seuss
Publisher: Random House Children's Books
Level: 6-7

Solla Sollew is a tale of a young person who discovers the “troubles” of life and wishes to escape them. Through a series of adventures experienced when trying to reach the mythical city of the title (“where they never have troubles/at least very few”) the protagonist comes to realize that he must face his problems instead of running away from them. (At the end of the book, it is revealed that the mythical city has just one problem: a creature given to slapping keys out of keyholes has taken up residence in the gate to the city, and it is considered extremely bad luck to kill this kind of creature. As a result, nobody can get into the city. In fact, the mayor moves to another city called Boola Boom-Ball, “where they never have troubles/no troubles at all.”) It features typical fantastic occurrences, as well as some mild political statements. In one instance, the protagonist is forced to pull a wagon for a bossy would-be helper. In another scene, he is drafted into the army under the command of the fearsome, but ultimately cowardly, tyrant General Genghis Khan Schmitz.

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